Author: Joe

“Sweeteners” not part of carbohydrates, sweeteners are food additives used to give food a sweet taste. A distinction is made between sugar substitutes (polyols) and intense sweeteners (saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame potassium, cyclamates and rebaudioside A). Beneficial or inappropriate for a healthy diet? The question is valid. polyols Polyols (mannitol E421, xylitol E967, sorbitol E420, isomalt, maltitol, licasin, etc.) provide mostly as many calories as sugar, but do not cause tooth decay. They have no effect on blood sugar levels. Its sweetening power is slightly lower than that of sugar. They are used in confectionery and “sugar-free” chewing gum, as well…

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Nutrients are used by the body to produce energy, make the basic components of our cells and maintain our body’s chemical balances. However, sex, age, morphology, genetic heritage and physical activity create different needs for each of us. Provide energy All our body functions use energy. For example moving, breathing, thinking and even digesting! To produce this energy, our body has several sources of fuel and several production mechanisms. Energy expenditure The body’s energy expenditure can be classified into two families, those linked directly to the maintenance of the body’s internal chemical balances and those linked to intellectual and physical…

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To stay healthy, our body needs a sufficient supply of minerals and vitamins. Conversely, an excessive intake can become the source of sometimes serious diseases. Therefore, a balanced diet is necessary. Our bones, mineral reserves Our body is able to accumulate sometimes large amounts of mineral salts in the bones, teeth, blood, liver or muscles. For example, the body of a person weighing 65 kilograms contains approximately one kilogram of calcium, 700 g of phosphorus and 25 g of magnesium. Mineral salts Bones contain a large part of our reserves of mineral salts, in particular calcium and magnesium. When the…

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Provided in sufficient quantity by a varied and balanced diet, mineral salts and trace elements are essential for our health. They provide many vital functions in our body whose needs differ according to age, sex and lifestyle. What are mineral salts and trace elements? Mineral compounds represent between 4 and 5% of our body weight. These substances are called mineral salts (or macroelements) when they are found in large quantities in the body, and trace elements (or trace elements) when they are contained only in very small quantities. Mineral salts in our body The main mineral salts found in the…

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Like mineral salts and trace elements, vitamins are essential for our health. They participate in many chemical reactions in the body. Our body does not manufacture them, they must be provided through a varied and balanced diet. Sometimes provided in supplement form, they should be used with caution. Should we take vitamins? As part of a varied and balanced diet, there is no point in taking vitamin supplements. In too large amounts, it can even have negative effects, especially with vitamins A, D, E, K and even vitamin C. When it may be necessary to take vitamins In certain specific…

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A protein is made up of a chain of small molecules called amino acids. There are about twenty amino acids in the human body. Our body is capable, if necessary, of making a dozen with food. The other eight essential amino acids must be provided by food. What are proteins for? Proteins serve as building blocks for all cells in the body. They are especially abundant in muscles. Proteins make up 20% of body weight, but 75% of muscle weight. The enzymes and certain hormones necessary for the functioning of the body are also part of the protein family. The…

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Soluble or insoluble dietary fibers are contained in plants. Since we cannot digest them, their energy intake is low. For a long time they were considered to have no effect on digestion, or even as useless, but now we realize that they play an important role. The benefits of fiber There are two groups of fibers according to their chemical properties and their nutritional qualities. In the presence of water, after a swelling step, the fibers can dissolve or remain insoluble. Soluble fibers These fibers, such as pectins, gums or oligosaccharides, are contained in fruits and vegetables. They have the…

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Indispensable for the balance of our body, table salt is used in all kitchens, on all tables and even in industrial preparations. Salt (sodium chloride) is necessary for life. It participates in the maintenance of body hydration and the balance of blood pressure. However, excess sodium is harmful to our health. In the West, our consumption far exceeds the recommended daily intake of salt. The consequences of excess sodium Excessive salt consumption would play a role in increasing blood pressure, especially in people who are overweight or obese. Excess salt would also promote osteoporosis by increasing the removal of calcium…

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Lipids are the fats found in our diet. Chemically, they are made up of substances called fatty acids. Like carbohydrates, they are an important source of energy. But excessive accumulation of fat is harmful to health. Therefore, a balance of dietary fats is essential. What is the role of fat? We need lipids to provide energy to our bodies: one gram of lipids contains twice as much energy as one gram of carbohydrates or proteins (9 calories per 1 g of lipids, 4 calories per 1 g of carbohydrates or proteins ). Around 90% of the calories provided by lipids…

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There is no sugar, but carbohydrates that differ in their molecular structure or in their effect on blood sugar. It is interesting to know which terms such as “simple”, “complex”, “slow” or “fast” hide sugar and integrate the notion of the glycemic index. Simple sugars, complex sugars According to their structure, we distinguish: simple sugars whose structure is based either on a single molecule (glucose, galactose or fructose), or on two molecules (sucrose, maltose or lactose); complex sugars, made up of long chains of molecules, such as starch in bread, cereals and potatoes. The latest analyzes of consumption habits have…

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